Miami-Artist: Luis Pinto

“Daughters of the North Wind: The Book of Thought”
2011
15×11″
charcoal and ink

Luis Pinto is a Miami-artist, illustrator and musician but decides to focus more in creating artistic mythologies that leaves the viewer with no mental or emotional limitation, entering perhaps a part of their minds they don’t … really … often get to. For the past seven years, Luis has been creating the graphics for most of Miami’s underground night life and works with companies like Poplife, PS14, Vagabond, Electric Pickle, Whiteroom/Eve and other contemporary venues on Miami Beach. The premiere of his solo-exhibit, “Before The Legends of Men“, in Miami Beach’s shop “KidRobot” around the month of June, displayed a side of him which clearly let those who went know his feelings toward technology and questioned the never-ending flow of information in modern society. Another one of his projects this past year in Miami was to start a zine.

Luis mentioned to me, “I wanted to try to get a movement going, the zine was conceptual. Started mostly for fun to try and get some snowball effect started in Miami, which lacks zine culture.” With time, and with people who were also interested in this zine movement, a small community of artists joined and it was big enough that finally with the 12th Issue, a zine release party and art installation at Kill Your Idols called Beaux (another one of his ideas to do a happy hour with a 1950-1995 rock theme) was taken place on September 6. During this time, Luis Pinto created a few murals at Grand Central in Downtown and included in one of these creations was a Rest In Peace mural for DJ Mehdi.

As of today, Luis is about to release a new issue of StrangeWays Volume 2 which is in his zine work and he is also about to start a large scale mural in Hollywood. Dedicated in not only his art, but in editing and curating, Luis Pinto is extremely connected with different realms of this world and is kept busy with projects and his own personal work.

Before finishing this article, I asked Luis to tell us how he feels about all his creations as of this current moment and time- in which he responded, “I’m pretty pleased with all the projects that I am working with now, I could say I have reached my goal but to place a limitation on an imaginary scale would be dumb, one can never be complete or you become obsolete.”

To the observers, the message from this novel artist on his fine art is as follows, “My art takes the intangible and turns it tangible, there really is not a direct message, or some social commentary, but it’s more of trying to make connections in spirituality. While also utilizing the subject matter to create a dialogue between the symbolism and using the medium to relate impressions and instances. Each piece might have a meaning but I like for it to be re-interpreted.”